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New York State Education Commissioner Dr. John King fielded angry questions and comments at a Common Core forum on Long Island in 2013.
NYCLU LHV March 19, 2014 at 03:44 pm
We will be holding a free public forum on our students' right to learn. Among the topics to beRead More discussed will be about the Common Core. Please join us at the Greenburgh Public Library on March 25 at 6:30 PM. Thank you, lowerhudsonvalley@nyclu.org
Commack Resident March 21, 2014 at 11:02 am
My son is a top student in 4th grade. He easily passed the new Common Core State ELA and Math testsRead More last year. This year, he is NOT taking them. I have no doubt he would "pass" again, but, really, is there any real value to passing a meaningless test? He consistently earns top scores on all classroom exams. He reads at an 8th grade level. He has nothing to prove, and I will not allow my 9 year old child to sit through more than 12 hours of tests to prove what we already know...he can read, write and do math at, at least, a 4th grade level. It is not kids like my son that I am concerned about. Other children are the ones hurt most by these tests. Like the little boy we know, who is one of the best math students in his grade, yet gets pulled from the classroom to attend mandatory remedial math instruction because of poor performance on last year's state tests. No one- not his parents, his teacher, or the remedial instructor-thinks this boy needs remedial instruction. Yet, it is mandatory because of a poorly written, ambiguous exam, that failed to test the concepts that the children were taught in the classroom. Many, many students are in similar situations. I am not against standardized tests in general. I allowed my son to take them last year and he performed well. Now that I realize how utterly meaningless the state tests are in their current form, and also just how many hours these poor little children are forced to sit through to take them, I am vehemently opposed to them. We have notified the school, in advance, of our decision to refuse the tests this year. I urge all parents to do the same. We will continue to refuse the tests every year, until the subject matter being tested actually has a real relationship to what the kids are being taught in the classroom, and until the 12 hour-long evaluation is reduced to a more reasonable length, one that 8 and 9 year olds can actually be expected to sit still and concentrate for.
Aidan April 11, 2014 at 10:04 pm
http://www.usnews.com/opinion/articles/2014/03/17/how-common-core-standards-kill-creative-teaching
Protesters stand outside of the News 12 studio in Woodbury on Monday to demand Gov. Andrew Cuomo to fix or scrap the controversial new Common Core curriculum. Credit: Monica Gleberman
Aidan April 13, 2014 at 05:56 am
Just trying to educate you … over and over again.
David April 13, 2014 at 02:18 pm
@Elsie I'll grant that it's a hard question for second grade. Students can show divisibility byRead More showing 12 being split into 4 equal parts, and again into 6 equal parts, with a diagram, but I think few second graders would get this right. Any second grader who gets this right is showing unusual mathematical talent, or at least unusual advancement in meeting common core standards. Don't we want to allow such unusual talent to be recognized? Especially in elementary grades these days, there seems so little opportunity for it these days.
Elsie April 18, 2014 at 04:23 pm
@David -- Talent should be recognized by differentiating instruction. Those 2nd graders who can doRead More this should, those who can't should be taught at a level that is more developmentally appropriate for them. There is very little room for enriching those students who should be or helping those students who need it using the Engage NY Modules. I am not a teacher but I have looked at the NY modules and the CC standards. I believe that teachers can address CC standards without the developmental inappropriateness of the NY requirements.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Credit: Office of the Governor.
James C. Walker August 5, 2013 at 04:45 pm
Here comes a serious five year money-grab scam that will have virtually nothing to do with safety.Read More Officials say they "don't know where the cameras will be placed". That is nonsense. The cameras will be placed ONLY where the posted speed limits are deliberately set far below the safe speeds of travel in those areas. The cameras are very expensive and they are used ONLY where most of their tickets go to safe drivers who are not causing any safety hazards for anyone. It is the only way the money-grab math works out. Ticket cameras are for-profit business partnerships between camera companies whose only motivation is profit ... and cities willing to deliberately mis-engineer their traffic safety parameters to issue most tickets to safe drivers for profits. The "job" of these new ticket cameras is to pilfer the wallets of mostly safe drivers for profits for the next five years. James C. Walker, Life Member-National Motorists Association
yamaniiman June 8, 2013 at 01:40 pm
Having trained the teachers since 2010 to do the transition to Common Core does the time spanRead More between that training and now have any reflection on the preparedness of the students? I think not. Many students continue to struggle and some are improving but the sudden jump into the Common Core abyss will sift out a large number of students. Quality of education is very important. To achieve and reach higher standards we must take these steps in strides...not sift and dump. It's like making a baby walk at 6 months as opposed to the time it would normally take to crawl, stand and make that first step.
Scottilla March 5, 2013 at 03:57 pm
This might be a problem if the districts spending more didn't get better results than the districtsRead More spending less. We know that in general (with some exceptions of course) the higher spending districts get better results. If districts want to spend more, and the taxpayers vote to support the boards of education in these districts, then nothing can or should be done to stop them. What the state can control is the amount of state aid that goes to each district. The state should be supporting the poor districts and not the rich districts. If a poor district can't afford to fund their schools, they should be helped. If a rich district refuses to fund their schools, they should not be helped.
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